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Architecting EDI with SAP IDocs
62,99 € *
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Welcome to Hollywood! Follow the saga of the Acme Pictures movie studio as it exchanges information with its vendor and its primary customer to put low-budget sci-fi movies on shelves. This entertaining case study showcases the requirements, standards, and capabilities for building an SAP EDI system and optimizing electronic information exchange via IDocs. From configuring IDocs, to generating purchase orders and goods receipts, to processing invoices, this script teaches you how to make your EDI system a star. 1. Cross-Industry Standard See what makes IDocs in SAP and EDI the heart, bones, arteries, and brains of modern businesses and government organizations. 2. The Full Picture Build the EDI system step by step, from generating the purchase order, to building outbound order confirmation, to processing the inbound payment advice using IDocs. 3. Custom IDocs Using ABAP, ALE, and XML, explore custom utilities that extend standard SAP functionality. 4. Test Your System Learn how to achieve success and diagnose failure by using monitoring tools to troubleshoot. 5. Updated and Expanded In this second edition, find new custom tools and utilities, a renewed focus on the business context, and new interfaces from the purchasing cycle. Highlights include: Business process integration IDoc architecture and configuration Custom IDocs and extensions Mapping specifications Message control Customer purchase orders Replication services Inbound goods receipts and invoices Outbound advance shipments and invoices Custom IDoc tools EDI and IDocs troubleshooting and recovery

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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DB2 Developer's Guide
85,99 € *
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DB2 Developer's Guide is the Product Description DB2 Developer's Guide is the field's #1 go-to source for on-the-job information on programming and administering DB2 on IBM z/OS mainframes. Now, three-time IBM Information Champion Craig S. Mullins has thoroughly updated this classic for DB2 v9 and v10. Mullins fully covers new DB2 innovations including temporal database support; hashing; universal tablespaces; pureXML; performance, security and governance improvements; new data types, and much more. Using current versions of DB2 for z/OS, readers will learn how to: * Build better databases and applications for CICS, IMS, batch, CAF, and RRSAF * Write proficient, code-optimized DB2 SQL * Implement efficient dynamic and static SQL applications * Use binding and rebinding to optimize applications * Efficiently create, administer, and manage DB2 databases and applications * Design, build, and populate efficient DB2 database structures for online, batch, and data warehousing * Improve the performance of DB2 subsystems, databases, utilities, programs, and SQL stat DB2 Developer's Guide, Sixth Edition builds on the unique approach that has made previous editions so valuable. It combines: * Condensed, easy-to-read coverage of all essential topics: information otherwise scattered through dozens of documents * Detailed discussions of crucial details within each topic * Expert, field-tested implementation advice * Sensible examples Backcover The Definitive Solutions-Oriented Guide to DB2 for z/OS: Now Fully Updated for Both v9 and v10! DB2 Developer's Guide is the world's #1 go-to source for on-the-job information on programming and administering DB2. Now, three-time IBM Information Champion Craig S. Mullins has thoroughly updated this classic for the newest versions of DB2 for z/OS: DB2 V9 andV10. This Sixth Edition builds on the unique approach that has made previous editions so valuable. It brings together condensed, easy-to-read coverage of all essential topics: information otherwise scattered through dozens of IBM and third-party documents. Throughout, Mullins offers focused drill-down on the key details DB2 developers need to succeed, with expert, field-tested implementation advice and realistic examples. Extensive updates address IBM's latest DB2 for z/OS innovations and best practices. Mullins introduces DB2's newest data types, performance and security enhancements, pureXML support, and much more. Whether you're a professional DB2 developer, DBA, sysadmin, or advanced user, this book will make you more productive, effective, and successful. Coverage includes . Modern DB2 SQL tools, tips, and tricks . Best practices for data definition, indexing, and change management . Large objects and object/relational databases . Temporal data support . DB2 security, authorization, and auditing . Dynamic SQL programming and DB2 stored procedures . "Under the hood" with the DB2 Optimizer and Catalog . Performance monitoring in-depth: EXPLAIN, object monitoring, and RTS . REORG, RUNSTATS, REBIND: superior approaches to managing DB2 access path changes . DB2 tuning: environment, components, and resource governing . Optimizing DB2 utilities and commands Preface xxiii PART I: SQL TECHNIQUES, TIPS, AND TRICKS Chapter 1 The Magic Words 3 An Overview of SQL 4 SQL Tools of the Trade 13 Static SQL 42 Dynamic SQL 44 SQL Performance Factors 45 Chapter 2 Data Manipulation Guidelines 56 A Bag of Tricks 56 SQL Access Guidelines 58 Complex SQL Guidelines 90 Common Table Expressions and Recursion 110 Working with Nulls 115 Date and Time Guidelines 119 Data Modification Guidelines 125 Chapter 3 Using DB2 Functions 135 Aggregate Functions 135 Scalar Functions 141 Table Functions 159 MQSeries Built-In Functions 159 XML Built-In Functions 161 The RAISE_ERROR Function 162 The CAST Operation 163 Built-In Function Guidelines 163 Chapter 4 Using DB2 User-Defined Functions and Data Types 167 What Is a User-Defined Function? 167 Types of User-Defined Functions (UDFs) 168 What Is a User-Defined Data Type? 190 User-Defined Data Types (UDTs) and Strong Typing 191 Chapter 5 Data Definition Guidelines 200 An Overview of DB2 Database Objects 200 DB2 Databases 201 Creating and Using DB2 Table Spaces 204 DB2 Storage and STOGROUPs 239 Table Guidelines 244 General Table Guidelines 275 Normalization and Denormalization 278 Assuring Data Integrity in DB2 290 Referential Integrity 290 Views, Aliases, and Synonyms 302 Index Guidelines 313 Naming Conventions 313 Miscellaneous DDL Guidelines 322 Chapter 6 DB2 Indexing and Hashing Guidelines 324 How an Index Works 324 Creating Indexes 326 DB2 Hashing and Hash Organized Tables 337 Index and Hash Guidelines 34 Chapter 7 Database Change Management, Schema Evolution, and Database Definition On Demand 53 Online Schema Changes 354 Versioning for Online Schema Changes 370 Chapter 8 Using DB2 Triggers 373 What Is a Trigger? 373 Trigger Guidelines 388 Chapter 9 Large Objects and Object/Relational Databases 393 Defining the Term "Object/Relational" 393 What Is a Large Object? 394 LOB Guidelines 403 DB2 Extenders 407 Chapter 10 pureXML: Using XML in DB2 for z/OS 408 What Is XML? 408 pureXML 412 XML-DB2 Guidelines 425 Chapter 11 Supporting Temporal Data in DB2 for z/OS 428 The Need for Temporal Data 428 DB2 Temporal Support 430 Temporal Data Guidelines 446 Summary 447 Chapter 12 DB2 Security, Authorization, and Auditing 448 Authorization and Privileges 448 Database Auditing 476 Using External Security (for Example, RACF, ACF2, and Top Secret) 480 PART II: DB2 APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT Chapter 13 Using DB2 in an Application Program 486 Embedded SQL Basics 487 Embedded SQL Guidelines 489 Host Variables 504 Programming with Cursors 511 Modifying Data with Embedded SQL 525 Application Development Guidelines 527 Batch Programming Guidelines 536 Online Programming Guidelines 547 General SQL Coding Guidelines 552 Introduction to Java 554 Using REXX and DB2 563 Developing Applications Using Only SQL 565 Chapter 14 Dynamic SQL Programming 567 What Is Dynamic SQL? 567 Dynamic SQL Versus Static SQL 569 The Four Classes of Dynamic SQL 576 pureQuery 588 Making Dynamic SQL More Static and Vice Versa 589 Dynamic SQL Guidelines 594 Chapter 15 Program Preparation 601 Program Preparation Steps 601 Running a DB2 Program 608 Preparing a DB2 Program 609 What Is a DBRM? 622 What Is a Plan? 622 What Is a Package? 623 What Is a Collection? 628 Versions 629 Converting DBRM-Based Plans in DB2 V10 630 Program Preparation Objects 631 Program Preparation Guidelines 632 Chapter 16 Using DB2 Stored Procedures 65 6 What Is a Stored Procedure? 657 Implementing DB2 Stored Procedures 661 Procedural SQL 678 The Procedural DBA 683 IBM Data Studio 687 Chapter 17 DB2 and the Internet 689 The Internet Phenomenon 689 Accessing DB2 over the Internet 692 Finding DB2 Information Using the Internet 695 PART III: DB2 IN-DEPTH Chapter 18 The Doors to DB2 704 DB2 Program Execution Basics 704 TSO (Time-Sharing Option) 706 CICS (Customer Information Control System) 726 IMS (Information Management System) 751 CAF (Call Attach Facility) 763 RRSAF (Recoverable Resource Manager Services Attach Facility) 767 Comparison of the Environments 768 Chapter 19 Data Sharing 772 Data Sharing Benefits 772 Data Sharing Requirements 774 The DB2 Coupling Facility 778 Data Sharing Naming Conventions 782 Data Sharing Administration &nbThe Definitive Solutions-Oriented Guide to DB2 for z/OS: Now Fully Updated for Both v9 and v10! DB2 Developer's Guide is the world's #1 go-to source for on-the-job information on programming and administering DB2. Now, three-time IBM Information Champion Craig S. Mullins has thoroughly updated this classic for the newest versions of DB2 for z/OS: DB2 V9 andV10. This Sixth Edition builds on the unique approach that has made previous editions so valuable. It brings together condensed, easy-to-read coverage of all essential topics: information otherwise scattered through dozens of IBM and third-party documents. Throughout, Mullins offers focused drill-down on the key details DB2 developers need to succeed, with expert, field-tested implementation advice and realistic examples. Extensive updates address IBM's latest DB2 for z/OS innovations and best practices. Mullins introduces DB2's newest data types, performance and security enhancements, pureXML support, and much more. Whether you're a professional DB2 developer, DBA, sysadmin, or advanced user, this book will make you more productive, effective, and successful. Coverage includes - Modern DB2 SQL tools, tips, and tricks - Best practices for data definition, indexing, and change management - Large objects and object/relational databases - Temporal data support - DB2 security, authorization, and auditing - Dynamic SQL programming and DB2 stored procedures - "Under the hood" with the DB2 Optimizer and Catalog - Performance monitoring in-depth: EXPLAIN, object monitoring, and RTS - REORG, RUNSTATS, REBIND: superior approaches to managing DB2 access path changes - DB2 tuning: environment, components, and resource governing - Optimizing DB2 utilities and commands

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
Zum Angebot
DB2 Developer's Guide
85,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

DB2 Developer's Guide is the Product Description DB2 Developer's Guide is the field's #1 go-to source for on-the-job information on programming and administering DB2 on IBM z/OS mainframes. Now, three-time IBM Information Champion Craig S. Mullins has thoroughly updated this classic for DB2 v9 and v10. Mullins fully covers new DB2 innovations including temporal database support; hashing; universal tablespaces; pureXML; performance, security and governance improvements; new data types, and much more. Using current versions of DB2 for z/OS, readers will learn how to: * Build better databases and applications for CICS, IMS, batch, CAF, and RRSAF * Write proficient, code-optimized DB2 SQL * Implement efficient dynamic and static SQL applications * Use binding and rebinding to optimize applications * Efficiently create, administer, and manage DB2 databases and applications * Design, build, and populate efficient DB2 database structures for online, batch, and data warehousing * Improve the performance of DB2 subsystems, databases, utilities, programs, and SQL stat DB2 Developer's Guide, Sixth Edition builds on the unique approach that has made previous editions so valuable. It combines: * Condensed, easy-to-read coverage of all essential topics: information otherwise scattered through dozens of documents * Detailed discussions of crucial details within each topic * Expert, field-tested implementation advice * Sensible examples Backcover The Definitive Solutions-Oriented Guide to DB2 for z/OS: Now Fully Updated for Both v9 and v10! DB2 Developer's Guide is the world's #1 go-to source for on-the-job information on programming and administering DB2. Now, three-time IBM Information Champion Craig S. Mullins has thoroughly updated this classic for the newest versions of DB2 for z/OS: DB2 V9 andV10. This Sixth Edition builds on the unique approach that has made previous editions so valuable. It brings together condensed, easy-to-read coverage of all essential topics: information otherwise scattered through dozens of IBM and third-party documents. Throughout, Mullins offers focused drill-down on the key details DB2 developers need to succeed, with expert, field-tested implementation advice and realistic examples. Extensive updates address IBM's latest DB2 for z/OS innovations and best practices. Mullins introduces DB2's newest data types, performance and security enhancements, pureXML support, and much more. Whether you're a professional DB2 developer, DBA, sysadmin, or advanced user, this book will make you more productive, effective, and successful. Coverage includes . Modern DB2 SQL tools, tips, and tricks . Best practices for data definition, indexing, and change management . Large objects and object/relational databases . Temporal data support . DB2 security, authorization, and auditing . Dynamic SQL programming and DB2 stored procedures . "Under the hood" with the DB2 Optimizer and Catalog . Performance monitoring in-depth: EXPLAIN, object monitoring, and RTS . REORG, RUNSTATS, REBIND: superior approaches to managing DB2 access path changes . DB2 tuning: environment, components, and resource governing . Optimizing DB2 utilities and commands Preface xxiii PART I: SQL TECHNIQUES, TIPS, AND TRICKS Chapter 1 The Magic Words 3 An Overview of SQL 4 SQL Tools of the Trade 13 Static SQL 42 Dynamic SQL 44 SQL Performance Factors 45 Chapter 2 Data Manipulation Guidelines 56 A Bag of Tricks 56 SQL Access Guidelines 58 Complex SQL Guidelines 90 Common Table Expressions and Recursion 110 Working with Nulls 115 Date and Time Guidelines 119 Data Modification Guidelines 125 Chapter 3 Using DB2 Functions 135 Aggregate Functions 135 Scalar Functions 141 Table Functions 159 MQSeries Built-In Functions 159 XML Built-In Functions 161 The RAISE_ERROR Function 162 The CAST Operation 163 Built-In Function Guidelines 163 Chapter 4 Using DB2 User-Defined Functions and Data Types 167 What Is a User-Defined Function? 167 Types of User-Defined Functions (UDFs) 168 What Is a User-Defined Data Type? 190 User-Defined Data Types (UDTs) and Strong Typing 191 Chapter 5 Data Definition Guidelines 200 An Overview of DB2 Database Objects 200 DB2 Databases 201 Creating and Using DB2 Table Spaces 204 DB2 Storage and STOGROUPs 239 Table Guidelines 244 General Table Guidelines 275 Normalization and Denormalization 278 Assuring Data Integrity in DB2 290 Referential Integrity 290 Views, Aliases, and Synonyms 302 Index Guidelines 313 Naming Conventions 313 Miscellaneous DDL Guidelines 322 Chapter 6 DB2 Indexing and Hashing Guidelines 324 How an Index Works 324 Creating Indexes 326 DB2 Hashing and Hash Organized Tables 337 Index and Hash Guidelines 34 Chapter 7 Database Change Management, Schema Evolution, and Database Definition On Demand 53 Online Schema Changes 354 Versioning for Online Schema Changes 370 Chapter 8 Using DB2 Triggers 373 What Is a Trigger? 373 Trigger Guidelines 388 Chapter 9 Large Objects and Object/Relational Databases 393 Defining the Term "Object/Relational" 393 What Is a Large Object? 394 LOB Guidelines 403 DB2 Extenders 407 Chapter 10 pureXML: Using XML in DB2 for z/OS 408 What Is XML? 408 pureXML 412 XML-DB2 Guidelines 425 Chapter 11 Supporting Temporal Data in DB2 for z/OS 428 The Need for Temporal Data 428 DB2 Temporal Support 430 Temporal Data Guidelines 446 Summary 447 Chapter 12 DB2 Security, Authorization, and Auditing 448 Authorization and Privileges 448 Database Auditing 476 Using External Security (for Example, RACF, ACF2, and Top Secret) 480 PART II: DB2 APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT Chapter 13 Using DB2 in an Application Program 486 Embedded SQL Basics 487 Embedded SQL Guidelines 489 Host Variables 504 Programming with Cursors 511 Modifying Data with Embedded SQL 525 Application Development Guidelines 527 Batch Programming Guidelines 536 Online Programming Guidelines 547 General SQL Coding Guidelines 552 Introduction to Java 554 Using REXX and DB2 563 Developing Applications Using Only SQL 565 Chapter 14 Dynamic SQL Programming 567 What Is Dynamic SQL? 567 Dynamic SQL Versus Static SQL 569 The Four Classes of Dynamic SQL 576 pureQuery 588 Making Dynamic SQL More Static and Vice Versa 589 Dynamic SQL Guidelines 594 Chapter 15 Program Preparation 601 Program Preparation Steps 601 Running a DB2 Program 608 Preparing a DB2 Program 609 What Is a DBRM? 622 What Is a Plan? 622 What Is a Package? 623 What Is a Collection? 628 Versions 629 Converting DBRM-Based Plans in DB2 V10 630 Program Preparation Objects 631 Program Preparation Guidelines 632 Chapter 16 Using DB2 Stored Procedures 65 6 What Is a Stored Procedure? 657 Implementing DB2 Stored Procedures 661 Procedural SQL 678 The Procedural DBA 683 IBM Data Studio 687 Chapter 17 DB2 and the Internet 689 The Internet Phenomenon 689 Accessing DB2 over the Internet 692 Finding DB2 Information Using the Internet 695 PART III: DB2 IN-DEPTH Chapter 18 The Doors to DB2 704 DB2 Program Execution Basics 704 TSO (Time-Sharing Option) 706 CICS (Customer Information Control System) 726 IMS (Information Management System) 751 CAF (Call Attach Facility) 763 RRSAF (Recoverable Resource Manager Services Attach Facility) 767 Comparison of the Environments 768 Chapter 19 Data Sharing 772 Data Sharing Benefits 772 Data Sharing Requirements 774 The DB2 Coupling Facility 778 Data Sharing Naming Conventions 782 Data Sharing Administration &nbThe Definitive Solutions-Oriented Guide to DB2 for z/OS: Now Fully Updated for Both v9 and v10! DB2 Developer's Guide is the world's #1 go-to source for on-the-job information on programming and administering DB2. Now, three-time IBM Information Champion Craig S. Mullins has thoroughly updated this classic for the newest versions of DB2 for z/OS: DB2 V9 andV10. This Sixth Edition builds on the unique approach that has made previous editions so valuable. It brings together condensed, easy-to-read coverage of all essential topics: information otherwise scattered through dozens of IBM and third-party documents. Throughout, Mullins offers focused drill-down on the key details DB2 developers need to succeed, with expert, field-tested implementation advice and realistic examples. Extensive updates address IBM's latest DB2 for z/OS innovations and best practices. Mullins introduces DB2's newest data types, performance and security enhancements, pureXML support, and much more. Whether you're a professional DB2 developer, DBA, sysadmin, or advanced user, this book will make you more productive, effective, and successful. Coverage includes - Modern DB2 SQL tools, tips, and tricks - Best practices for data definition, indexing, and change management - Large objects and object/relational databases - Temporal data support - DB2 security, authorization, and auditing - Dynamic SQL programming and DB2 stored procedures - "Under the hood" with the DB2 Optimizer and Catalog - Performance monitoring in-depth: EXPLAIN, object monitoring, and RTS - REORG, RUNSTATS, REBIND: superior approaches to managing DB2 access path changes - DB2 tuning: environment, components, and resource governing - Optimizing DB2 utilities and commands

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Database Systems: Pearson New International Edi...
78,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For Database Systems and Database Design and Application courses offered at the junior, senior and graduate levels in Computer Science departments. Written by well-known computer scientists, this introduction to database systems offers a comprehensive approach, focusing on database design, database use, and implementation of database applications and database management systems. The first half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the database designer, user, and application programmer. It covers the latest database standards SQL:1999, SQL/PSM, SQL/CLI, JDBC, ODL, and XML, with broader coverage of SQL than most other texts. The second half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the DBMS implementor. It focuses on storage structures, query processing, and transaction management. The book covers the main techniques in these areas with broader coverage of query optimization than most other texts, along with advanced topics including multidimensional and bitmap indexes, distributed transactions, and information integration techniques. Resources: Open access Author Website ¿http://infolab.stanford.edu/~ullman/dscb.html ¿includes Power Point slides, teaching notes, assignments, projects, Oracle Programming Guidelines, and solutions to selected exercises. Instructor only Pearson Resources: Complete Solutions Manual (click on the Resources tab above to view downloadable files) Features + Benefits Many real-world examples. Offers a readable and engaging presentation. Extensive treatment of database modeling–Includes detailed and separate explanations of how to use E/R and ODL to design databases. Teaches about this important first step of the planning process. Excellent, up-to-date and detailed coverage of SQL–Includes coverage of object-relational systems and many aspects of the new SQL:1999 standard. Provides a more extensive treatment of query processing than other books on the market. Discussion of the technologies used to connect database programming with C or Java code–Includes discussions of SQL/PSM, SQL/CLI, and JDBC. Gives students practical advice on integrating state-of-the-art technologies with databases. Coverage of advanced issues important to database designers and users. Includes discussions of views, integrity constraints, assertions, triggers, transactions, authorization, and recursion in SQL:1999. Discussions of how to successfully plan a database application before building it. Reflects how these plans are developed in the real world. Coverage of topics such as designing storage structures and implementing a variety of indexing schemes. Shows students how to build efficient database management systems. Extensive coverage of query processing and optimization. Shows students how to fine tune database systems to improve performance. Comprehensive coverage of transaction processing mechanisms for concurrency control and recovery, including distributed and long-duration transactions. Shows how to design complex database systems that can handle real-world business applications. Coverage of information integration, including data warehousing, mediation, OLAP, data-cube systems, and data mining. Exposes readers to cutting edge technology used in business applications. Extensive exercises–In almost every section. Provides students with the opportunity to practice and apply the concepts they've learned in each chapter. Please note that GOAL/Gradiance is no longer available with this book. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 The Worlds of Database Systems 1.1 The Evolution of Database Systems 1.1.1 Early Database Management Systems 1.1.2 Relational Database Systems 1.1.3 Smaller and Smaller Systems 1.1.4 Bigger and Bigger Systems 1.1.5 Information Integration 1.2 Overview of a Database Management System 1.2.1 Data-Definition Language Commands 1.2.2 Overview of Query Processing 1.2.3 Storage and Buffer Management 1.2.4 Transaction Processing 1.2.5 The Query Processor 1.3 Outline of Database-System Studies 1.4 References for Chapter 1 PART I: Relational Database Modeling 2 The Relational Model of Data 2.1 An Overview of Data Models 2.1.1 What is a Data Model? 2.1.2 Important Data Models 2.1.3 The Relational Model in Brief 2.1.4 The Semistructured Model in Brief 2.1.5 Other Data Models 2.1.6 Comparison of Modeling Approaches 2.2 Basics of the Relational Model 2.2.1 Attributes 2.2.2 Schemas 2.2.3 Tuples 2.2.4 Domains 2.2.5 Equivalent Representations of a Relation 2.2.6 Relation Instances 2.2.7 Keys of Relations 2.2.8 An Example Database Schema 2.2.9 Exercises for Section 2.2 2.3 Defining a Relation Schema in SQL 2.3.1 Relations in SQL 2.3.2 Data Types 2.3.3 Simple Table Declarations 2.3.4 Modifying Relation Schemas 2.3.5 Default Values 2.3.6 Declaring Keys 2.3.7 Exercises for Section 2.3 2.4 An Algebraic Query Language 2.4.1 Why Do We Need a Special Query Language? 2.4.2 What is an Algebra? 2.4.3 Overview of Relational Algebra 2.4.4 Set Operations on Relations 2.4.5 Projection 2.4.6 Selection 2.4.7 Cartesian Product 2.4.8 Natural Joins 2.4.9 Theta-Joins 2.4.10 Combining Operations to Form Queries 2.4.11 Naming and Renaming 2.4.12 Relationships Among Operations 2.4.13 A Linear Notation for Algebraic Expressions 2.4.14 Exercises for Section 2.4 2.5 Constraints on Relations 2.5.1 Relational Algebra as a Constraint Language 2.5.2 Referential Integrity Constraints 2.5.3 Key Constraints 2.5.4 Additional Constraint Examples 2.5.5 Exercises for Section 2.5 2.6 Summary of Chapter 2 2.7 References for Chapter 2 3 Design Theory for Relational Databases 3.1 Functional Dependencies 3.1.1 Definition of Functional Dependency 3.1.2 Keys of Relations 3.1.3 Superkeys 3.1.4 Exercises for Section 3.1 3.2 Rules About Functional Dependencies 3.2.1 Reasoning About Functional Dependencies 3.2.2 The Splitting/Combining Rule 3.2.3 Trivial Functional Dependencies 3.2.4 Computing the Closure of Attributes 3.2.5 Why the Closure Algorithm Works 3.2.6 The Transitive Rule 3.2.7 Closing Sets of Functional Dependencies 3.2.8 Projecting Functional Dependencies 3.2.9 Exercises for Section 3.2 3.3 Design of Relational Database Schemas 3.3.1 Anomalies 3.3.2 Decomposing Relations 3.3.3 Boyce-Codd Normal Form 3.3.4 Decomposition into BCNF 3.3.5 Exercises for Section 3.3 3.4 Decomposition: The Good, Bad, and Ugly 3.4.1 Recovering Information from a Decomposition 3.4.2 The Chase Test for Lossless Join 3.4.3 Why the Chase Works 3.4.4 Dependency Preservation 3.4.5 Exercises for Section 3.4 3.5 Third Normal Form 3.5.1 Definition of Third Normal Form 3.5.2 The Synthesis Algorithm for 3NF Schemas 3.5.3 Why the 3NF Synthesis Algorithm Works 3.5.4 Exercises for Section 3.5 3.6 Multivalued Dependencies 3.6.1 Attribute Independence and Its Consequent Redundancy 3.6.2 Definition of Multivalued Dependencies 3.6.3 Reasoning About Multivalued Dependencies 3.6.4 Fourth Normal Form 3.6.5 Decomposition into Fourth Normal Form 3.6.6 Relationships Among Normal Forms 3.6.7 Exercises for Section 3.6 3.7 An Algorithm for Discovering MVD's 3.7.1 The Closure and the Chase 3.7.2 Extending the Chase to MVD's 3.7.3 Why the Chase Works for MVD's 3.7.4 Projecting MVD's 3.7.5 Exercises for Section 3.7 3.8 Summary of Chapter 3 3.9 References for Chapter 3 4 High-Level Database Models 4.1 The Entity/Relationship Model 4.1.1 Entity Sets 4.1.2 Attributes 4.1.3 Relationships 4.1.4 Entity-Relationship Diagrams 4.1.5 Instances of an E/R Diagram 4.1.6 Multiplicity of Binary E/R Relationships 4.1.7 Multiway Relationships 4.1.8 Roles in Relationships 4.1.9 Attributes on Relationships 4.1.10 Converting Multiway Relationships to Binary 4.1.11 Subclasses in the E/R Model 4.1.12 Exercises for Section 4.1 4.2 Design Principles 4.2.1 Faithfulness 4.2.2 Avoiding Redundancy 4.2.3 Simplicity Counts 4.2.4 Choosing the Right Relationships 4.2.5 Picking the Right Kind of Element 4.2.6 Exercises for Section 4.2 4.3 Constraints in the E/R Model 4.3.1 Keys in the E/R Model 4.3.2 Representing Keys in the E/R Model 4.3.3 Referential Integrity 4.3.4 Degree Constraints 4.3.5 Exercises for Section 4.3 4.4 Weak Entity Sets 4.4.1 Causes of Weak Entity Sets 4.4.2 Requirements for Weak Entity Sets 4.4.3 Weak Entity Set Notation 4.4.4 Exercises for Section 4.4 4.5 From E/R Diagrams to Relational Designs 4.5.1 From Entity Sets to Relations 4.5.2 From E/R Relationships to Relations 4.5.3 Combining Relations 4.5.4 Handling Weak Entity Sets 4.5.5 Exercises for Section 4.5 4.6 Converting Subclass Structures to Relations 4.6.1 E/R-Style Conversion 4.6.2 An Object-Oriented ApproachFor Database Systems and Database Design and Application courses offered at the junior, senior and graduate levels in Computer Science departments. Written by well-known computer scientists, this introduction to database systems offers a comprehensive approach, focusing on database design, database use, and implementation of database applications and database management systems. The first half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the database designer, user, and application programmer. It covers the latest database standards SQL:1999, SQL/PSM, SQL/CLI, JDBC, ODL, and XML, with broader coverage of SQL than most other texts. The second half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the DBMS implementor. It focuses on storage structures, query processing, and transaction management. The book covers the main techniques in these areas with broader coverage of query optimization than most other texts, along with advanced topics including multidimensional and bitmap indexes, distributed transactions, and information integration techniques. Resources: * Open access Author Website ¿¿includes Power Point slides, teaching notes, assignments, projects, Oracle Programming Guidelines, and solutions to selected exercises. * Instructor only Pearson Resources: Complete Solutions Manual (click on the Resources tab above to view downloadable files)

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Database Systems: Pearson New International Edi...
78,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For Database Systems and Database Design and Application courses offered at the junior, senior and graduate levels in Computer Science departments. Written by well-known computer scientists, this introduction to database systems offers a comprehensive approach, focusing on database design, database use, and implementation of database applications and database management systems. The first half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the database designer, user, and application programmer. It covers the latest database standards SQL:1999, SQL/PSM, SQL/CLI, JDBC, ODL, and XML, with broader coverage of SQL than most other texts. The second half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the DBMS implementor. It focuses on storage structures, query processing, and transaction management. The book covers the main techniques in these areas with broader coverage of query optimization than most other texts, along with advanced topics including multidimensional and bitmap indexes, distributed transactions, and information integration techniques. Resources: Open access Author Website ¿http://infolab.stanford.edu/~ullman/dscb.html ¿includes Power Point slides, teaching notes, assignments, projects, Oracle Programming Guidelines, and solutions to selected exercises. Instructor only Pearson Resources: Complete Solutions Manual (click on the Resources tab above to view downloadable files) Features + Benefits Many real-world examples. Offers a readable and engaging presentation. Extensive treatment of database modeling–Includes detailed and separate explanations of how to use E/R and ODL to design databases. Teaches about this important first step of the planning process. Excellent, up-to-date and detailed coverage of SQL–Includes coverage of object-relational systems and many aspects of the new SQL:1999 standard. Provides a more extensive treatment of query processing than other books on the market. Discussion of the technologies used to connect database programming with C or Java code–Includes discussions of SQL/PSM, SQL/CLI, and JDBC. Gives students practical advice on integrating state-of-the-art technologies with databases. Coverage of advanced issues important to database designers and users. Includes discussions of views, integrity constraints, assertions, triggers, transactions, authorization, and recursion in SQL:1999. Discussions of how to successfully plan a database application before building it. Reflects how these plans are developed in the real world. Coverage of topics such as designing storage structures and implementing a variety of indexing schemes. Shows students how to build efficient database management systems. Extensive coverage of query processing and optimization. Shows students how to fine tune database systems to improve performance. Comprehensive coverage of transaction processing mechanisms for concurrency control and recovery, including distributed and long-duration transactions. Shows how to design complex database systems that can handle real-world business applications. Coverage of information integration, including data warehousing, mediation, OLAP, data-cube systems, and data mining. Exposes readers to cutting edge technology used in business applications. Extensive exercises–In almost every section. Provides students with the opportunity to practice and apply the concepts they've learned in each chapter. Please note that GOAL/Gradiance is no longer available with this book. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 The Worlds of Database Systems 1.1 The Evolution of Database Systems 1.1.1 Early Database Management Systems 1.1.2 Relational Database Systems 1.1.3 Smaller and Smaller Systems 1.1.4 Bigger and Bigger Systems 1.1.5 Information Integration 1.2 Overview of a Database Management System 1.2.1 Data-Definition Language Commands 1.2.2 Overview of Query Processing 1.2.3 Storage and Buffer Management 1.2.4 Transaction Processing 1.2.5 The Query Processor 1.3 Outline of Database-System Studies 1.4 References for Chapter 1 PART I: Relational Database Modeling 2 The Relational Model of Data 2.1 An Overview of Data Models 2.1.1 What is a Data Model? 2.1.2 Important Data Models 2.1.3 The Relational Model in Brief 2.1.4 The Semistructured Model in Brief 2.1.5 Other Data Models 2.1.6 Comparison of Modeling Approaches 2.2 Basics of the Relational Model 2.2.1 Attributes 2.2.2 Schemas 2.2.3 Tuples 2.2.4 Domains 2.2.5 Equivalent Representations of a Relation 2.2.6 Relation Instances 2.2.7 Keys of Relations 2.2.8 An Example Database Schema 2.2.9 Exercises for Section 2.2 2.3 Defining a Relation Schema in SQL 2.3.1 Relations in SQL 2.3.2 Data Types 2.3.3 Simple Table Declarations 2.3.4 Modifying Relation Schemas 2.3.5 Default Values 2.3.6 Declaring Keys 2.3.7 Exercises for Section 2.3 2.4 An Algebraic Query Language 2.4.1 Why Do We Need a Special Query Language? 2.4.2 What is an Algebra? 2.4.3 Overview of Relational Algebra 2.4.4 Set Operations on Relations 2.4.5 Projection 2.4.6 Selection 2.4.7 Cartesian Product 2.4.8 Natural Joins 2.4.9 Theta-Joins 2.4.10 Combining Operations to Form Queries 2.4.11 Naming and Renaming 2.4.12 Relationships Among Operations 2.4.13 A Linear Notation for Algebraic Expressions 2.4.14 Exercises for Section 2.4 2.5 Constraints on Relations 2.5.1 Relational Algebra as a Constraint Language 2.5.2 Referential Integrity Constraints 2.5.3 Key Constraints 2.5.4 Additional Constraint Examples 2.5.5 Exercises for Section 2.5 2.6 Summary of Chapter 2 2.7 References for Chapter 2 3 Design Theory for Relational Databases 3.1 Functional Dependencies 3.1.1 Definition of Functional Dependency 3.1.2 Keys of Relations 3.1.3 Superkeys 3.1.4 Exercises for Section 3.1 3.2 Rules About Functional Dependencies 3.2.1 Reasoning About Functional Dependencies 3.2.2 The Splitting/Combining Rule 3.2.3 Trivial Functional Dependencies 3.2.4 Computing the Closure of Attributes 3.2.5 Why the Closure Algorithm Works 3.2.6 The Transitive Rule 3.2.7 Closing Sets of Functional Dependencies 3.2.8 Projecting Functional Dependencies 3.2.9 Exercises for Section 3.2 3.3 Design of Relational Database Schemas 3.3.1 Anomalies 3.3.2 Decomposing Relations 3.3.3 Boyce-Codd Normal Form 3.3.4 Decomposition into BCNF 3.3.5 Exercises for Section 3.3 3.4 Decomposition: The Good, Bad, and Ugly 3.4.1 Recovering Information from a Decomposition 3.4.2 The Chase Test for Lossless Join 3.4.3 Why the Chase Works 3.4.4 Dependency Preservation 3.4.5 Exercises for Section 3.4 3.5 Third Normal Form 3.5.1 Definition of Third Normal Form 3.5.2 The Synthesis Algorithm for 3NF Schemas 3.5.3 Why the 3NF Synthesis Algorithm Works 3.5.4 Exercises for Section 3.5 3.6 Multivalued Dependencies 3.6.1 Attribute Independence and Its Consequent Redundancy 3.6.2 Definition of Multivalued Dependencies 3.6.3 Reasoning About Multivalued Dependencies 3.6.4 Fourth Normal Form 3.6.5 Decomposition into Fourth Normal Form 3.6.6 Relationships Among Normal Forms 3.6.7 Exercises for Section 3.6 3.7 An Algorithm for Discovering MVD's 3.7.1 The Closure and the Chase 3.7.2 Extending the Chase to MVD's 3.7.3 Why the Chase Works for MVD's 3.7.4 Projecting MVD's 3.7.5 Exercises for Section 3.7 3.8 Summary of Chapter 3 3.9 References for Chapter 3 4 High-Level Database Models 4.1 The Entity/Relationship Model 4.1.1 Entity Sets 4.1.2 Attributes 4.1.3 Relationships 4.1.4 Entity-Relationship Diagrams 4.1.5 Instances of an E/R Diagram 4.1.6 Multiplicity of Binary E/R Relationships 4.1.7 Multiway Relationships 4.1.8 Roles in Relationships 4.1.9 Attributes on Relationships 4.1.10 Converting Multiway Relationships to Binary 4.1.11 Subclasses in the E/R Model 4.1.12 Exercises for Section 4.1 4.2 Design Principles 4.2.1 Faithfulness 4.2.2 Avoiding Redundancy 4.2.3 Simplicity Counts 4.2.4 Choosing the Right Relationships 4.2.5 Picking the Right Kind of Element 4.2.6 Exercises for Section 4.2 4.3 Constraints in the E/R Model 4.3.1 Keys in the E/R Model 4.3.2 Representing Keys in the E/R Model 4.3.3 Referential Integrity 4.3.4 Degree Constraints 4.3.5 Exercises for Section 4.3 4.4 Weak Entity Sets 4.4.1 Causes of Weak Entity Sets 4.4.2 Requirements for Weak Entity Sets 4.4.3 Weak Entity Set Notation 4.4.4 Exercises for Section 4.4 4.5 From E/R Diagrams to Relational Designs 4.5.1 From Entity Sets to Relations 4.5.2 From E/R Relationships to Relations 4.5.3 Combining Relations 4.5.4 Handling Weak Entity Sets 4.5.5 Exercises for Section 4.5 4.6 Converting Subclass Structures to Relations 4.6.1 E/R-Style Conversion 4.6.2 An Object-Oriented ApproachFor Database Systems and Database Design and Application courses offered at the junior, senior and graduate levels in Computer Science departments. Written by well-known computer scientists, this introduction to database systems offers a comprehensive approach, focusing on database design, database use, and implementation of database applications and database management systems. The first half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the database designer, user, and application programmer. It covers the latest database standards SQL:1999, SQL/PSM, SQL/CLI, JDBC, ODL, and XML, with broader coverage of SQL than most other texts. The second half of the book provides in-depth coverage of databases from the point of view of the DBMS implementor. It focuses on storage structures, query processing, and transaction management. The book covers the main techniques in these areas with broader coverage of query optimization than most other texts, along with advanced topics including multidimensional and bitmap indexes, distributed transactions, and information integration techniques. Resources: * Open access Author Website ¿¿includes Power Point slides, teaching notes, assignments, projects, Oracle Programming Guidelines, and solutions to selected exercises. * Instructor only Pearson Resources: Complete Solutions Manual (click on the Resources tab above to view downloadable files)

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Fact-of-Death Data Exchange Using Clinical Docu...
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The electronic health record (EHR) has been noted to improve health care, with the obvious advantages of retrieving information faster and easier, with greater legibility, and meeting and enabling auditing and legal requirements. Clinicians often use natural language when describing observations, diagnoses, and other biomedical concepts. This can make translation into machine-level semantics more complicated. To allow for documents to be read by computerized systems, a standard method of representing data would be preferred. Health Level 7 (HL7) has created standards for representing clinical documents, and for information exchange, usually implemented in extensible markup language (XML). The HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) is made up of these document standards (Dolin, et al., 2001). Clinical documents must conform to standards if the free text in clinical notes is to be utilized in an efficient, effective manner. There exists a need to create a CDA-compliant message specification for 'fact of death' for the purposes of notifying institutions connected to a health information exchange (HIE) about the death of a person.

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XML Update Language
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The project is aimed to develop an XML update language built on top of XQuery by adding on update primitives, which complies with the standard XQuery Update Facility 1.0 requirements. The end product does this in a flexible way, using a software archi- tecture which enables developers to choose among different XQuery engines and various XML Processing APIs in order to achieve the overall optimal performance for queries with different characteristics. This thesis starts with an investigation on existing proposals and implementations for XML updates, and describes the approach for the proposed XML update language, followed by an explanation of its implementation. In the end three groups of experiments are undertaken to evaluate the performance of this implementation: software- related, query-related, and tests for other factors. Software-related experiments identify the overall optimal implementation of the software. Query- related analysis studies how the performance varies for queries with different characteristics. Tests for other factors investigate the limitations of the software (i.e. input file size and disk space requirement).

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Cardinality-Aware and Purely Relational XQuery ...
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XQuery is the standard XML query language, significa t effort has been made in developing efficient implementations of XQuery query processor.This thesis describes a purely relational implementation of an XQuery processor which exploits the well-known maturity and performance acceleration techniques of the relational database technology to translate XQuery expressions into their equivalent SQL evaluation scripts. The generated SQL evaluation scripts can be executed on any conventional relational database management systems with no need for any changes in its kernel or any other special requirements. In addition, this thesis presents a novel framework for estimating the cardinality of XQuery expressions as well as its sub-expressions. Although cardinality size estimation is very important on its own, it is also very crucial for an effective query optimization process. This thesis presents an integrated framework for exploiting the available estimated cardinality information to provide the RDBMS query optimizers with hints for selecting the best alternative execution plan for the SQL evaluation scripts of the input XQuery expression.

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Distributed GIS: Federation and performance eva...
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Geographic information is critical for many earth related geo-science applications such as building disaster planning, crisis management, early-warning systems and urban planning. Decision making in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) increasingly relies on analyses of spatial data in map-based formats. Maps are complex structures composed of layers created from distributed heterogeneous data belonging to the separate organizations. This thesis presents a distributed service architecture for managing the production of knowledge from distributed collections of archived observations and simulation data through integrated data-views. Integrated views are defined by a federation service ( federator ) located on top of the standard service components. Common GIS standards enable the construction of this system. However, compliance requirements for interoperability, such as XML-encoded data and domain specific data characteristics, have costs and performance overhead. We investigate issues of combining standard compliance with performance. Although our framework is designed for GIS, we extend the principles and requirements to general science domains.

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