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Noetscher, Bernd: Human Machine Interface Desig...
14,99 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 06.05.2018, Medium: Taschenbuch, Einband: Kartoniert / Broschiert, Titel: Human Machine Interface Design mit State Chart XML, Titelzusatz: Evaluation von SCXML zur Nutzung in Model-Driven Development anhand der Implementierung des Qt Creators und Qt Frameworks, Autor: Noetscher, Bernd, Verlag: GRIN Verlag, Sprache: Deutsch, Rubrik: Programmiersprachen, Seiten: 36, Informationen: Paperback, Gewicht: 69 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Human Machine Interface Design mit State Chart XML
12,99 € *
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Human Machine Interface Design mit State Chart XML ab 12.99 € als pdf eBook: Evaluation von SCXML zur Nutzung in Model-Driven Development anhand der Implementierung des Qt Creators und Qt Frameworks. Aus dem Bereich: eBooks, Sachthemen & Ratgeber, Computer & Internet,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Java platform
41,49 € *
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Java platform ab 41.49 € als Taschenbuch: Java Java Virtual Machine Java Platform Enterprise Edition Java Servlet Java applet Java Platform Standard Edition Java remote method invocation Java Platform Micro Edition Jakarta Project JUnit Java XML. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Ratgeber, Computer & Internet,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Domain-Specific Languages
56,99 € *
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Designed as a wide-ranging guide to Domain Specific Languages (DSLs) and how to approach building them, this book covers a variety of different techniques available for DSLs. The goal is to provide readers with enough information to make an informed choice about whether or not to use a DSL and what kinds of DSL techniques to employ. Part I is a 150-page narrative overview that gives you a broad understanding of general principles. The reference material in Parts II through VI provides the details and examples you'll need to get started using the various techniques discussed. Both internal and external DSL topics are covered, in addition to alternative computational models and code generation. Although the general principles and patterns presented can be used with whatever programming language you happen to be using, most of the examples are in Java or C#. Product Description When carefully selected and used, Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) may simplify complex code, promote effective communication with customers, improve productivity, and unclog development bottlenecks. In Domain-Specific Languages, noted software development expert Martin Fowler first provides the information software professionals need to decide if and when to utilize DSLs. Then, where DSLs prove suitable, Fowler presents effective techniques for building them, and guides software engineers in choosing the right approaches for their applications. This book's techniques may be utilized with most modern object-oriented languages; the author provides numerous examples in Java and C#, as well as selected examples in Ruby. Wherever possible, chapters are organized to be self-standing, and most reference topics are presented in a familiar patterns format. Armed with this wide-ranging book, developers will have the knowledge they need to make important decisions about DSLs-and, where appropriate, gain the significant technical and business benefits they offer. The topics covered include: . How DSLs compare to frameworks and libraries, and when those alternatives are sufficient . Using parsers and parser generators, and parsing external DSLs . Understanding, comparing, and choosing DSL language constructs . Determining whether to use code generation, and comparing code generation strategies . Previewing new language workbench tools for creating DSLs Backcover Designed as a wide-ranging guide to Domain Specific Languages (DSLs) and how to approach building them, this book covers a variety of different techniques available for DSLs. The goal is to provide readers with enough information to make an informed choice about whether or not to use a DSL and what kinds of DSL techniques to employ. Part I is a 150-page narrative overview that gives you a broad understanding of general principles. The reference material in Parts II through VI provides the details and examples you will need to get started using the various techniques discussed. Both internal and external DSL topics are covered, in addition to alternative computational models and code generation. Although the general principles and patterns presented can be used with whatever programming language you happen to be using, most of the examples are in Java or C#. Preface xix Part I: Narratives 1 Chapter 1: An Introductory Example 3 Gothic Security 3 The State Machine Model 5 Programming Miss Grant's Controller 9 Languages and Semantic Model 16 Using Code Generation 19 Using Language Workbenches 22 Visualization 24 Chapter 2: Using Domain-Specific Languages 27 Defining Domain-Specific Languages 27 Why Use a DSL? 33 Problems with DSLs 36 Wider Language Processing 39 DSL Lifecycle 40 What Makes a Good DSL Design? 42 Chapter 3: Implementing DSLs 43 Architecture of DSL Processing 43 The Workings of a Parser 47 Grammars, Syntax, and Semantics 49 Parsing Data 50 Macros 52 Chapter 4: Implementing an Internal DSL 67 Fluent and Command-Query APIs 68 The Need for a Parsing Layer 71 Using Functions 72 Literal Collections 77 Using Grammars to Choose Internal Elements 79 Closures 80 Parse Tree Manipulation 82 Annotation 84 Literal Extension 85 Reducing the Syntactic Noise 85 Dynamic Reception 86 Providing Some Type Checking 87 Chapter 5: Implementing an External DSL 89 Syntactic Analysis Strategy 89 Output Production Strategy 92 Parsing Concepts 94 Mixing-in Another Language 100 XML DSLs 101 Chapter 6: Choosing between Internal and External DSLs 105 Learning Curve 105 Cost of Building 106 Programmer Familiarity 107 Communication with Domain Experts 108 Mixing In the Host Language 108 Strong Expressiveness Boundary 109 Runtime Configuration 110 Sliding into Generality 110 Composing DSLs 111 Summing Up 111 Chapter 7: Alternative Computational Models 113 A Few Alternative Models 116 Chapter 8: Code Generation 121 Choosing What to Generate 122 How to Generate 124 Mixing Generated and Handwritten Code 126 Generating Readable Code 127 Preparse Code Generation 128 Further Reading 128 Chapter 9: Language Workbenches 129 Elements of Language Workbenches 130 Schema Definition Languages and Meta-Models 131 Source and Projectional Editing 136 Illustrative Programming 138 Tools Tour 140 Language Workbenches and CASE tools 141 Should You Use a Language Workbench? 142 Part II: Common Topics 145 Chapter 10: A Zoo of DSLs &nbWhen carefully selected and used, Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) may simplify complex code, promote effective communication with customers, improve productivity, and unclog development bottlenecks. In Domain-Specific Languages, noted software development expert Martin Fowler first provides the information software professionals need to decide if and when to utilize DSLs. Then, where DSLs prove suitable, Fowler presents effective techniques for building them, and guides software engineers in choosing the right approaches for their applications. This book's techniques may be utilized with most modern object-oriented languages; the author provides numerous examples in Java and C sharp, as well as selected examples in Ruby. Wherever possible, chapters are organized to be self-standing, and most reference topics are presented in a familiar patterns format. Armed with this wide-ranging book, developers will have the knowledge they need to make important decisions about DSLs--and, where appropriate, gain the significant technical and business benefits they offer. The topics covered include: / How DSLs compare to frameworks and libraries, and when those alternatives are sufficient / Using parsers and parser generators, and parsing external DSLs / Understanding, comparing, and choosing DSL language constructs / Determining whether to use code generation, and comparing code generation strategies / Previewing new language workbench tools for creating DSLs

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Domain-Specific Languages
56,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Designed as a wide-ranging guide to Domain Specific Languages (DSLs) and how to approach building them, this book covers a variety of different techniques available for DSLs. The goal is to provide readers with enough information to make an informed choice about whether or not to use a DSL and what kinds of DSL techniques to employ. Part I is a 150-page narrative overview that gives you a broad understanding of general principles. The reference material in Parts II through VI provides the details and examples you'll need to get started using the various techniques discussed. Both internal and external DSL topics are covered, in addition to alternative computational models and code generation. Although the general principles and patterns presented can be used with whatever programming language you happen to be using, most of the examples are in Java or C#. Product Description When carefully selected and used, Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) may simplify complex code, promote effective communication with customers, improve productivity, and unclog development bottlenecks. In Domain-Specific Languages, noted software development expert Martin Fowler first provides the information software professionals need to decide if and when to utilize DSLs. Then, where DSLs prove suitable, Fowler presents effective techniques for building them, and guides software engineers in choosing the right approaches for their applications. This book's techniques may be utilized with most modern object-oriented languages; the author provides numerous examples in Java and C#, as well as selected examples in Ruby. Wherever possible, chapters are organized to be self-standing, and most reference topics are presented in a familiar patterns format. Armed with this wide-ranging book, developers will have the knowledge they need to make important decisions about DSLs-and, where appropriate, gain the significant technical and business benefits they offer. The topics covered include: . How DSLs compare to frameworks and libraries, and when those alternatives are sufficient . Using parsers and parser generators, and parsing external DSLs . Understanding, comparing, and choosing DSL language constructs . Determining whether to use code generation, and comparing code generation strategies . Previewing new language workbench tools for creating DSLs Backcover Designed as a wide-ranging guide to Domain Specific Languages (DSLs) and how to approach building them, this book covers a variety of different techniques available for DSLs. The goal is to provide readers with enough information to make an informed choice about whether or not to use a DSL and what kinds of DSL techniques to employ. Part I is a 150-page narrative overview that gives you a broad understanding of general principles. The reference material in Parts II through VI provides the details and examples you will need to get started using the various techniques discussed. Both internal and external DSL topics are covered, in addition to alternative computational models and code generation. Although the general principles and patterns presented can be used with whatever programming language you happen to be using, most of the examples are in Java or C#. Preface xix Part I: Narratives 1 Chapter 1: An Introductory Example 3 Gothic Security 3 The State Machine Model 5 Programming Miss Grant's Controller 9 Languages and Semantic Model 16 Using Code Generation 19 Using Language Workbenches 22 Visualization 24 Chapter 2: Using Domain-Specific Languages 27 Defining Domain-Specific Languages 27 Why Use a DSL? 33 Problems with DSLs 36 Wider Language Processing 39 DSL Lifecycle 40 What Makes a Good DSL Design? 42 Chapter 3: Implementing DSLs 43 Architecture of DSL Processing 43 The Workings of a Parser 47 Grammars, Syntax, and Semantics 49 Parsing Data 50 Macros 52 Chapter 4: Implementing an Internal DSL 67 Fluent and Command-Query APIs 68 The Need for a Parsing Layer 71 Using Functions 72 Literal Collections 77 Using Grammars to Choose Internal Elements 79 Closures 80 Parse Tree Manipulation 82 Annotation 84 Literal Extension 85 Reducing the Syntactic Noise 85 Dynamic Reception 86 Providing Some Type Checking 87 Chapter 5: Implementing an External DSL 89 Syntactic Analysis Strategy 89 Output Production Strategy 92 Parsing Concepts 94 Mixing-in Another Language 100 XML DSLs 101 Chapter 6: Choosing between Internal and External DSLs 105 Learning Curve 105 Cost of Building 106 Programmer Familiarity 107 Communication with Domain Experts 108 Mixing In the Host Language 108 Strong Expressiveness Boundary 109 Runtime Configuration 110 Sliding into Generality 110 Composing DSLs 111 Summing Up 111 Chapter 7: Alternative Computational Models 113 A Few Alternative Models 116 Chapter 8: Code Generation 121 Choosing What to Generate 122 How to Generate 124 Mixing Generated and Handwritten Code 126 Generating Readable Code 127 Preparse Code Generation 128 Further Reading 128 Chapter 9: Language Workbenches 129 Elements of Language Workbenches 130 Schema Definition Languages and Meta-Models 131 Source and Projectional Editing 136 Illustrative Programming 138 Tools Tour 140 Language Workbenches and CASE tools 141 Should You Use a Language Workbench? 142 Part II: Common Topics 145 Chapter 10: A Zoo of DSLs &nbWhen carefully selected and used, Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) may simplify complex code, promote effective communication with customers, improve productivity, and unclog development bottlenecks. In Domain-Specific Languages, noted software development expert Martin Fowler first provides the information software professionals need to decide if and when to utilize DSLs. Then, where DSLs prove suitable, Fowler presents effective techniques for building them, and guides software engineers in choosing the right approaches for their applications. This book's techniques may be utilized with most modern object-oriented languages; the author provides numerous examples in Java and C sharp, as well as selected examples in Ruby. Wherever possible, chapters are organized to be self-standing, and most reference topics are presented in a familiar patterns format. Armed with this wide-ranging book, developers will have the knowledge they need to make important decisions about DSLs--and, where appropriate, gain the significant technical and business benefits they offer. The topics covered include: / How DSLs compare to frameworks and libraries, and when those alternatives are sufficient / Using parsers and parser generators, and parsing external DSLs / Understanding, comparing, and choosing DSL language constructs / Determining whether to use code generation, and comparing code generation strategies / Previewing new language workbench tools for creating DSLs

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Human Machine Interface Design mit State Chart XML
12,99 € *
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Human Machine Interface Design mit State Chart XML ab 12.99 EURO Evaluation von SCXML zur Nutzung in Model-Driven Development anhand der Implementierung des Qt Creators und Qt Frameworks

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Fact-of-Death Data Exchange Using Clinical Docu...
49,00 € *
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The electronic health record (EHR) has been noted to improve health care, with the obvious advantages of retrieving information faster and easier, with greater legibility, and meeting and enabling auditing and legal requirements. Clinicians often use natural language when describing observations, diagnoses, and other biomedical concepts. This can make translation into machine-level semantics more complicated. To allow for documents to be read by computerized systems, a standard method of representing data would be preferred. Health Level 7 (HL7) has created standards for representing clinical documents, and for information exchange, usually implemented in extensible markup language (XML). The HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) is made up of these document standards (Dolin, et al., 2001). Clinical documents must conform to standards if the free text in clinical notes is to be utilized in an efficient, effective manner. There exists a need to create a CDA-compliant message specification for 'fact of death' for the purposes of notifying institutions connected to a health information exchange (HIE) about the death of a person.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Developing Graphical Design Tool Using Eclipse ...
59,00 € *
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The book explains in detail how the Eclipse technologies: Eclipse Modeling Framework EMF, Graphical Editing Framework GEF, Graphical Modeling Framework GMF, and Java Emitter Templates JET can be used to develop graphical design tool. The development process is explained using the X-Machine toolkit case study. X-Machine is one of the effective formal methods that can be applied to the system specification phase to represent the model of the system formally and precisely using a combination of easily understood diagrams and very precise words. Then the X-Machine model is used to generate an implementation of the system and to develop a complete functional testing method for the system. The developed X-Machine toolkit within Eclipse platform has a professional look and feel. The implemented toolkit allows the user to construct X-Machine models diagrammatically, store the constructed models specifications in XML format, validate the data of the constructed models to make sure that it confirms to the constraints placed on that data, generate Java code from the constructed models, animate the X-Machine State-Transition diagram, and generate test cases from the constructed model.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Apertium
29,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Apertium is a machine translation platform being developed with funding from the Spanish government and the government of Catalonia at the Universitat d''Alacant (University of Alicante). It is free software and released under the terms of the GNU General Public License. Apertium originated as one of the machine translation engines in the project OpenTrad and was originally designed to translate between closely related languages, although it has recently been expanded to treat more divergent language pairs. To create a new machine translation system, one just has to develop linguistic data (dictionaries, rules) in well-specified XML formats.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 06.04.2020
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